1 corinthians 4 explained

1 Corinthians 4:20 Context. 17 For this cause have I sent unto you Timotheus, who is my beloved son, and faithful in the Lord, who shall bring you into remembrance of my ways which be in Christ, as I teach every where in every church. 18 Now some are puffed up, as though I would not come to you. 19 But I will come to you shortly, if the Lord ... 1 Corinthians 4:6-7. These people were using the gifts that God gave to them to divide the church. They were separating themselves into cliques, getting people in the congregation to say, "I am of Paul, I am of Apollos, I am of Peter," and so forth because "Peter represents this, Paul represents this other thing, and what Paul has is better," and "Peter is not teaching this, and Paul is ... 1. How does Paul describe himself and his fellow laborers? See 1 Corinthians 4:1 (printed below) What is the primary... 2. Paul was aware that the Corinthian Christians were critical and judgmental of him. How does Paul handle such a spirit... 3. In verses 6-16 the apostle Paul addresses the spirit ...St. Paul felt a yearning desire that his unique claim as the founder of their Church should not be so ungratefully overlooked, as though it were of no importance (comp. 1 Corinthians 3:6; 1 Corinthians 9:1, 2; Acts 18:11). I have begotten you. The word is here only used in a secondary and metaphoric sense, as in Philemon 1:10; Galatians 4:19. 1 Corinthians 4:9 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓] 1 Corinthians 4:9, NIV: For it seems to me that God has put us apostles on display at the end of the procession, like those condemned to die in the arena. We have been made a spectacle to the whole universe, to angels as well as to human beings. St. Paul felt a yearning desire that his unique claim as the founder of their Church should not be so ungratefully overlooked, as though it were of no importance (comp. 1 Corinthians 3:6; 1 Corinthians 9:1, 2; Acts 18:11). I have begotten you. The word is here only used in a secondary and metaphoric sense, as in Philemon 1:10; Galatians 4:19. Click the verse number to read commentary, definitions, meanings, and notes for that particular 1-corinthians 4 verse. 1-corinthians 4:1 Let a man so account of us, as of the ministers of Christ, and stewards of the mysteries of God. 1-corinthians 4:2 Moreover it is required in stewards, that a man be found faithful. 1 Corinthians 4:18. As though now I were not coming to you, some are puffed up.Paul begins 1 Corinthians 4 by agreeing that he and the other ministers are servants of Christ and stewards of the mysteries of God. In that role, it does matter that they are faithful, and the Lord will judge their works when the time comes. Paul, though, is not worried about the opinion of the Corinthians or anyone else. They are not his judges. First Corinthians 4:14-21 focuses on Paul's role as spiritual father to the Corinthians, since he is the one who led them to Christ. He urges them to change their attitudes and behaviors and to imitate his example in living out the gospel.Smith's Bible Commentary. Chapter 4. 1 Corinthians 4:1. Ministers of Christ, the Greek word there is the under-rowers. They were the guys down in the bottom of the ship handling the oars, usually chained to the oars. And the fellow up on top would call the order for them to row and which side to row, the under-rowers. Smith's Bible Commentary. Chapter 4. 1 Corinthians 4:1. Ministers of Christ, the Greek word there is the under-rowers. They were the guys down in the bottom of the ship handling the oars, usually chained to the oars. And the fellow up on top would call the order for them to row and which side to row, the under-rowers. CHAPTER 4 . This, then, is how you ought to regard us: as servants of Christ and as those entrusted with the mysteries God has revealed. 1 Corinthians 4:1. Paul, Apollos and the other leaders were just servants of Christ. The apostle does not use the normal Greek word of diakonos for “servant” but rather, the word hupēretēs. 1Cr 4:7-13. Here the apostle improves the foregoing hint to a caution against pride and self-conceit, and sets forth the temptations the Corinthians had to despise him, from the difference of their circumstances. I. The apostle exhorts to have in proper esteem the preachers of the Gospel, and that because they are Christ's ministers and stewards of his grace, and faithful in the discharge of their duty, 1 Corinthians 4:1. And as for himself, whom he includes in the number of the faithful dispensers of the word, he cared not what judgment was passed upon ... Aug 12, 2002 · 1 Corinthians 4:9. “For I think that God has displayed us, the apostles, last, as men condemned to death; for we have been made a spectacle to the world, both to angels and to men.”. For I think that God has displayed us, the apostles, last, as men condemned to death; God “displayed” the apostles last as men condemned to death. 1 Corinthians 4:6-7. These people were using the gifts that God gave to them to divide the church. They were separating themselves into cliques, getting people in the congregation to say, "I am of Paul, I am of Apollos, I am of Peter," and so forth because "Peter represents this, Paul represents this other thing, and what Paul has is better," and "Peter is not teaching this, and Paul is ... Matthew Henry Bible Commentary (complete) << 1 Corinthians 3 | 1 Corinthians 4 | 1 Corinthians 5 >>. (Read all of 1 Corinthians 4) Complete Concise. In this chapter the apostle, I. Directs them how to account of him and his fellow-ministers, and therein, tacitly at least, reproves them for their unworthy carriage towards him (v. 1-6). II. The one who judges me is the Lord. (5) Therefore, judge nothing before the appointed time, wait until the Lord comes. He will bring to light the things hidden in darkness and will reveal the intentions of the hearts, and then each one shall receive from God the praise he deserves. (1 Corinthians 4:3-5) Making distinctions and issuing judgments about other believers' fidelity, maturity, deserved esteem, or anything else is not for the Corinthians to do.St. Paul felt a yearning desire that his unique claim as the founder of their Church should not be so ungratefully overlooked, as though it were of no importance (comp. 1 Corinthians 3:6; 1 Corinthians 9:1, 2; Acts 18:11). I have begotten you. The word is here only used in a secondary and metaphoric sense, as in Philemon 1:10; Galatians 4:19. The Church in Corinth and Paul’s Letters (1 Corinthians) Paul arrived in Corinth in the winter of AD 49/50 [4] and lived there for a year and a half. While there he supported himself by working in tentmaking—or perhaps leather working [5] (Acts 18:2), the trade he had learned as a boy—in the workshop of Aquila and Priscilla (see 1 Cor. 4: ... Enduring Word Bible Commentary 1 Corinthians Chapter 4 1 Corinthians 4 – Are You Glorified Without Us? A. How the Corinthians should consider Paul and the apostles. 1. (1-2) Servants and stewards. Let a man so consider us, as servants of Christ and stewards of the mysteries of God. Moreover it is required in stewards that one be found faithful. a. Paul's judgments of the community at Corinth are not mean to drive people away but to encourage them to reflect the fact that they are the body of Christ (12:27). Our judge has been judged. As already mentioned, there is also a wider horizon within which Paul is operating.A. The contrast between tongues and prophecy. 1. ( 1Cr 14:1) The guiding principles. Pursue love, and desire spiritual gifts, but especially that you may prophesy. a. Pursue love: Paul, under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, brilliantly declared the preeminence of love for Christians in 1 Corinthians 13. Now, since love is the greatest, we ... Jun 26, 2004 · Introduction. Corinth was a strategically located Roman city on the main land route between East and West and was the crossroads for several sea routes. Corinth was famous for its intellectual and material prosperity and was honored with being the capitol of Achaia. It also became famous for its corruption. 1Cr 4:7-13. Here the apostle improves the foregoing hint to a caution against pride and self-conceit, and sets forth the temptations the Corinthians had to despise him, from the difference of their circumstances. I. 1 Corinthians 4:4. For I know nothing by myself. Which must be understood with a restriction to the subject he is upon, faithfulness in the ministry; otherwise he knew much by himself of indwelling sin, and the corruption of his nature, which he sometimes found very strong and prevalent in him, and of the daily infirmities of life; but as to his ministerial service, he was pure from the blood of all men; he honestly declared what he knew to be the mind of God, and concealed nothing ...The word of God is the best rule by which to judge as to men. Pride commonly is at the bottom of quarrels. Self-conceit contributes to produce undue esteem of our teachers, as well as of ourselves. We shall not be puffed up for one against another, if we remember that all are instruments, employed by God, and endowed by him with various talents. First Corinthians 4:14-21 focuses on Paul's role as spiritual father to the Corinthians, since he is the one who led them to Christ. He urges them to change their attitudes and behaviors and to imitate his example in living out the gospel.1 Corinthians 4:9 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓] 1 Corinthians 4:9, NIV: For it seems to me that God has put us apostles on display at the end of the procession, like those condemned to die in the arena. We have been made a spectacle to the whole universe, to angels as well as to human beings. God has revealed. 2 Now it is required that those who have been given a trust must prove faithful. 3 I care very little if I am judged by you or by any human court; indeed, I do not even judge myself. 4 My conscience is clear, but that does not make me innocent. It is the Lord who judges me. 5 Therefore judge nothingClick the verse number to read commentary, definitions, meanings, and notes for that particular 1-corinthians 4 verse. 1-corinthians 4:1 Let a man so account of us, as of the ministers of Christ, and stewards of the mysteries of God. 1-corinthians 4:2 Moreover it is required in stewards, that a man be found faithful. 1 Corinthians 4:4 “For I know nothing by myself; yet am I not hereby justified: but he that judgeth me is the Lord.” Justified, as we have explained before, means just as if I had never sinned. Paul in this, however, is saying he ministers what the Holy Spirit of God gives him. Jun 26, 2004 · Introduction. Corinth was a strategically located Roman city on the main land route between East and West and was the crossroads for several sea routes. Corinth was famous for its intellectual and material prosperity and was honored with being the capitol of Achaia. It also became famous for its corruption. 1 Corinthians 4 (King James Version) 1 Let a man so account of us, as of the ministers of Christ, and stewards of the mysteries of God. 2 Moreover it is required in stewards, that a man be found faithful. 3 But with me it is a very small thing that I should be judged of you, or of man's judgment: yea, I judge not mine own self.1. ( 1Co 4:1-2) Servants and stewards. Let a man so consider us, as servants of Christ and stewards of the mysteries of God. Moreover it is required in stewards that one be found faithful. a. Let a man so consider us : Paul asks that he, and the other apostles ( us) be regarded by the Corinthians as servants. 1 Corinthians 4:15 For though ye have ten thousand instructors in Christ, yet have ye not many fathers: for in Christ Jesus I have begotten you through the gospel. God places people in our life for seasons. some stay / some go We learn from everyone around us if we just pay attention teachers, ...read more. Scripture: 1 Corinthians 4:15. 1. How does Paul describe himself and his fellow laborers? See 1 Corinthians 4:1 (printed below) What is the primary... 2. Paul was aware that the Corinthian Christians were critical and judgmental of him. How does Paul handle such a spirit... 3. In verses 6-16 the apostle Paul addresses the spirit ...1Cr 4:7-13. Here the apostle improves the foregoing hint to a caution against pride and self-conceit, and sets forth the temptations the Corinthians had to despise him, from the difference of their circumstances. I. Jun 26, 2004 · Introduction. Corinth was a strategically located Roman city on the main land route between East and West and was the crossroads for several sea routes. Corinth was famous for its intellectual and material prosperity and was honored with being the capitol of Achaia. It also became famous for its corruption. 1 Corinthians 4:10 "We [are] fools for Christ's sake, but ye [are] wise in Christ; we [are] weak, but ye [are] strong; ye [are] honorable, but we [are] despised." "Fools…Wise": Again, Paul is using sarcasm. This time on himself as if mimicking the attitude of the proud Corinthians toward him, Paul rebukes them.First Corinthians purpose seems to point to Jesus’ resurrection as a reality of history and is taken as to be indisputable and beyond questioning. This is testified by Paul’s listing of eye witnesses to Jesus’ resurrection and as being pivotal to the gospel of Jesus Christ. Paul’s counsel regarding the resurrection was that it was an ... 1 Corinthians 4:15 For though ye have ten thousand instructors in Christ, yet have ye not many fathers: for in Christ Jesus I have begotten you through the gospel. God places people in our life for seasons. some stay / some go We learn from everyone around us if we just pay attention teachers, ...read more. Scripture: 1 Corinthians 4:15. 1 Corinthians 4 Inductive Bible Study and Discussion Questions Outline: Paul and Apollos were stewards for God (1-2) The final exam (3-5) Paul didn't consider human opinions of himself important (3) Paul was innocent as far as he knew, but would finally be examined by God (4)Jun 26, 2004 · Introduction. Corinth was a strategically located Roman city on the main land route between East and West and was the crossroads for several sea routes. Corinth was famous for its intellectual and material prosperity and was honored with being the capitol of Achaia. It also became famous for its corruption. Enduring Word Bible Commentary 1 Corinthians Chapter 4 1 Corinthians 4 – Are You Glorified Without Us? A. How the Corinthians should consider Paul and the apostles. 1. (1-2) Servants and stewards. Let a man so consider us, as servants of Christ and stewards of the mysteries of God. Moreover it is required in stewards that one be found faithful. a. 1 Corinthians 4 - Are You Glorified Without Us? A. How the Corinthians should consider Paul and the apostles. 1. (1-2) Servants and stewards. Let a man so consider us, as servants of Christ and stewards of the mysteries of God. Moreover it is required in stewards that one be found faithful. a.1 Corinthians 4 (King James Version) 1 Let a man so account of us, as of the ministers of Christ, and stewards of the mysteries of God. 2 Moreover it is required in stewards, that a man be found faithful. 3 But with me it is a very small thing that I should be judged of you, or of man’s judgment: yea, I judge not mine own self. 1 let a man so account of us, as of the ministers of christ, and stewards of the mysteries of god. 2 moreover it is required in stewards, that a man be found faithful. 3 but with me it is a very small thing that i should be judged of you, or of man's judgment: yea, i judge not mine own self. 4 for i know nothing by myself; yet am i not hereby … 1 Corinthians /. 1 Corinthians 4. He preached in the same church as C. H. Spurgeon over one hundred years earlier. Yet most people today have never heard of John Gill. This is unfortunate, since his works contain priceless gems of information that are found nowhere except in the ancient writings of the Jews. Presented here is a verse by verse ... 1 Corinthians 4:1 Let a man regard us in this manner, as servants of Christ and stewards of the mysteries of God. Amplified - SO THEN, let us [apostles] be looked upon as ministering servants of Christ and stewards (trustees) of the mysteries (the secret purposes) of God.1Cr 4:7-13. Here the apostle improves the foregoing hint to a caution against pride and self-conceit, and sets forth the temptations the Corinthians had to despise him, from the difference of their circumstances. I. See verses 3-5 (printed below) Now it is a very insignificant matter to me that I should be judged by you or by any human court; indeed, I do not even judge myself. (4) I know of no charge against me; but this does not justify me. The one who judges me is the Lord. (5) Therefore, judge nothing before the appointed time, wait until the Lord comes. 1Cr 4:7-13. Here the apostle improves the foregoing hint to a caution against pride and self-conceit, and sets forth the temptations the Corinthians had to despise him, from the difference of their circumstances. I. CHAPTER 4 . This, then, is how you ought to regard us: as servants of Christ and as those entrusted with the mysteries God has revealed. 1 Corinthians 4:1. Paul, Apollos and the other leaders were just servants of Christ. The apostle does not use the normal Greek word of diakonos for “servant” but rather, the word hupēretēs. To the church of God which is at Corinth, to those who are sanctified in Christ Jesus, called to be saints, with all who in every place call on the name of Jesus Christ our Lord, both theirs and ours. a. To the church of God: Most people today associate the word church with a building where Christians meet.The apostle exhorts to have in proper esteem the preachers of the Gospel, and that because they are Christ's ministers and stewards of his grace, and faithful in the discharge of their duty, 1 Corinthians 4:1. And as for himself, whom he includes in the number of the faithful dispensers of the word, he cared not what judgment was passed upon ... 1 Corinthians 4:4 “For I know nothing by myself; yet am I not hereby justified: but he that judgeth me is the Lord.” Justified, as we have explained before, means just as if I had never sinned. Paul in this, however, is saying he ministers what the Holy Spirit of God gives him. St. Paul felt a yearning desire that his unique claim as the founder of their Church should not be so ungratefully overlooked, as though it were of no importance (comp. 1 Corinthians 3:6; 1 Corinthians 9:1, 2; Acts 18:11). I have begotten you. The word is here only used in a secondary and metaphoric sense, as in Philemon 1:10; Galatians 4:19. 1 Corinthians 4:4. For I know nothing by myself. Which must be understood with a restriction to the subject he is upon, faithfulness in the ministry; otherwise he knew much by himself of indwelling sin, and the corruption of his nature, which he sometimes found very strong and prevalent in him, and of the daily infirmities of life; but as to his ministerial service, he was pure from the blood of all men; he honestly declared what he knew to be the mind of God, and concealed nothing ...1 Corinthians 4:1 Let a man regard us in this manner, as servants of Christ and stewards of the mysteries of God. Amplified - SO THEN, let us [apostles] be looked upon as ministering servants of Christ and stewards (trustees) of the mysteries (the secret purposes) of God.The Church in Corinth and Paul’s Letters (1 Corinthians) Paul arrived in Corinth in the winter of AD 49/50 [4] and lived there for a year and a half. While there he supported himself by working in tentmaking—or perhaps leather working [5] (Acts 18:2), the trade he had learned as a boy—in the workshop of Aquila and Priscilla (see 1 Cor. 4: ... 1Cr 4:7-13. Here the apostle improves the foregoing hint to a caution against pride and self-conceit, and sets forth the temptations the Corinthians had to despise him, from the difference of their circumstances. I. CHAPTER 4 . This, then, is how you ought to regard us: as servants of Christ and as those entrusted with the mysteries God has revealed. 1 Corinthians 4:1. Paul, Apollos and the other leaders were just servants of Christ. The apostle does not use the normal Greek word of diakonos for “servant” but rather, the word hupēretēs. 1 Corinthians 4:6-7. These people were using the gifts that God gave to them to divide the church. They were separating themselves into cliques, getting people in the congregation to say, "I am of Paul, I am of Apollos, I am of Peter," and so forth because "Peter represents this, Paul represents this other thing, and what Paul has is better," and "Peter is not teaching this, and Paul is ... Corinth. Corinth was an important city. It was on a very narrow section of land (called an 'isthmus') in the southern part of Greece. 1. It was the capital city of the region called Achaia. 2. It had two harbours. The harbour on the east coast was 4 miles (6 km) from the harbour on the west coast. Today a canal joins the two harbours.1Cr 4:7-13. Here the apostle improves the foregoing hint to a caution against pride and self-conceit, and sets forth the temptations the Corinthians had to despise him, from the difference of their circumstances. I. "The first paragraph ( 1 Corinthians 4:1-5) leads the way by making an application of the servant model and showing how that relates to their treatment of him [Paul]. He changes images from farm to household and insists that he is God's servant, not theirs; and they are not allowed to judge another's servant.1 Corinthians 4:4. For I know nothing by myself. Which must be understood with a restriction to the subject he is upon, faithfulness in the ministry; otherwise he knew much by himself of indwelling sin, and the corruption of his nature, which he sometimes found very strong and prevalent in him, and of the daily infirmities of life; but as to his ministerial service, he was pure from the blood of all men; he honestly declared what he knew to be the mind of God, and concealed nothing ...1 Corinthians 4:6-7. These people were using the gifts that God gave to them to divide the church. They were separating themselves into cliques, getting people in the congregation to say, "I am of Paul, I am of Apollos, I am of Peter," and so forth because "Peter represents this, Paul represents this other thing, and what Paul has is better," and "Peter is not teaching this, and Paul is ... 1Think of us in this way, as servants (Greek: hyperetes) of Christ and stewards ( oikonomos) of God's mysteries ( mysterion). 2Moreover, it is required of stewards that they be found trustworthy ( pistos). 3But with me it is a very small thing that I should be judged ( anakrino) by you or by any human court ( hemera— day).The Church in Corinth and Paul’s Letters (1 Corinthians) Paul arrived in Corinth in the winter of AD 49/50 [4] and lived there for a year and a half. While there he supported himself by working in tentmaking—or perhaps leather working [5] (Acts 18:2), the trade he had learned as a boy—in the workshop of Aquila and Priscilla (see 1 Cor. 4: ... 1Cr 4:7-13. Here the apostle improves the foregoing hint to a caution against pride and self-conceit, and sets forth the temptations the Corinthians had to despise him, from the difference of their circumstances. I. Corinth. Corinth was an important city. It was on a very narrow section of land (called an 'isthmus') in the southern part of Greece. 1. It was the capital city of the region called Achaia. 2. It had two harbours. The harbour on the east coast was 4 miles (6 km) from the harbour on the west coast. Today a canal joins the two harbours.4:7-13 We have no reason to be proud; all we have, or are, or do, that is good, is owing to the free and rich grace of God. A sinner snatched from destruction by sovereign grace alone, must be very absurd and inconsistent, if proud of the free gifts of God. St. Paul sets forth his own circumstances, ver. 9. 1 Corinthians 13:4-7. In the New Testament, the most common Greek word for self-control (temperance, KJV) is enkrateia. Its root meaning is "power over oneself" or "self-mastery." Self-control, in its widest sense, is mastery over our passions. It is the virtue that holds our appetites in check, controlling our rational will or regulating our ... 1 Corinthians 4:4. For I know nothing by myself. Which must be understood with a restriction to the subject he is upon, faithfulness in the ministry; otherwise he knew much by himself of indwelling sin, and the corruption of his nature, which he sometimes found very strong and prevalent in him, and of the daily infirmities of life; but as to his ministerial service, he was pure from the blood of all men; he honestly declared what he knew to be the mind of God, and concealed nothing ...1Cr 4:7-13. Here the apostle improves the foregoing hint to a caution against pride and self-conceit, and sets forth the temptations the Corinthians had to despise him, from the difference of their circumstances. I. 1. ( 1Co 4:1-2) Servants and stewards. Let a man so consider us, as servants of Christ and stewards of the mysteries of God. Moreover it is required in stewards that one be found faithful. a. Let a man so consider us : Paul asks that he, and the other apostles ( us) be regarded by the Corinthians as servants. 11) place the apostles in the class of those to whom the beatitudes promise future relief (Mt 5:3–11; Lk 6:20–23); whereas the Corinthians’ image of themselves as “already” filled, rich, ruling , as wise, strong, and honored (1 Cor 4:10) places them paradoxically in the position of those whom the woes threaten with future undoing (Lk ... 1. ( 1Co 4:1-2) Servants and stewards. Let a man so consider us, as servants of Christ and stewards of the mysteries of God. Moreover it is required in stewards that one be found faithful. a. Let a man so consider us : Paul asks that he, and the other apostles ( us) be regarded by the Corinthians as servants. Smith's Bible Commentary. Chapter 4. 1 Corinthians 4:1. Ministers of Christ, the Greek word there is the under-rowers. They were the guys down in the bottom of the ship handling the oars, usually chained to the oars. And the fellow up on top would call the order for them to row and which side to row, the under-rowers. The apostle exhorts to have in proper esteem the preachers of the Gospel, and that because they are Christ's ministers and stewards of his grace, and faithful in the discharge of their duty, 1 Corinthians 4:1. And as for himself, whom he includes in the number of the faithful dispensers of the word, he cared not what judgment was passed upon ... Spiritual Resources Available (1 Corinthians 1:4–9) Bible Commentary / Produced by TOW Project. According to the conventions of ancient letter writing, a greeting was followed by a section in which the author praised the recipient. [1] In most of his letters, Paul modifies this literary form by offering thanksgiving rather than praise and by ... First Corinthians purpose seems to point to Jesus’ resurrection as a reality of history and is taken as to be indisputable and beyond questioning. This is testified by Paul’s listing of eye witnesses to Jesus’ resurrection and as being pivotal to the gospel of Jesus Christ. Paul’s counsel regarding the resurrection was that it was an ... The apostle exhorts to have in proper esteem the preachers of the Gospel, and that because they are Christ's ministers and stewards of his grace, and faithful in the discharge of their duty, 1 Corinthians 4:1. And as for himself, whom he includes in the number of the faithful dispensers of the word, he cared not what judgment was passed upon ... 1 Corinthians 4 (King James Version) 1 Let a man so account of us, as of the ministers of Christ, and stewards of the mysteries of God. 2 Moreover it is required in stewards, that a man be found faithful. 3 But with me it is a very small thing that I should be judged of you, or of man's judgment: yea, I judge not mine own self.The Church in Corinth and Paul’s Letters (1 Corinthians) Paul arrived in Corinth in the winter of AD 49/50 [4] and lived there for a year and a half. While there he supported himself by working in tentmaking—or perhaps leather working [5] (Acts 18:2), the trade he had learned as a boy—in the workshop of Aquila and Priscilla (see 1 Cor. 4: ... 1 Corinthians 4:6-7. These people were using the gifts that God gave to them to divide the church. They were separating themselves into cliques, getting people in the congregation to say, "I am of Paul, I am of Apollos, I am of Peter," and so forth because "Peter represents this, Paul represents this other thing, and what Paul has is better," and "Peter is not teaching this, and Paul is ... Matthew Henry Bible Commentary (complete) << 1 Corinthians 3 | 1 Corinthians 4 | 1 Corinthians 5 >>. (Read all of 1 Corinthians 4) Complete Concise. In this chapter the apostle, I. Directs them how to account of him and his fellow-ministers, and therein, tacitly at least, reproves them for their unworthy carriage towards him (v. 1-6). II. (Read 1 Corinthians 4:7-13) We have no reason to be proud; all we have, or are, or do, that is good, is owing to the free and rich grace of God. A sinner snatched from destruction by sovereign grace alone, must be very absurd and inconsistent, if proud of the free gifts of God. St. Paul sets forth his own circumstances, ver. 9.1 Corinthians chapter 4. New International Version. 1 This, then, is how you ought to regard us: as servants of Christ and as those entrusted with the mysteries God has revealed. 2 Now it is required that those who have been given a trust must prove faithful. 3 I care very little if I am judged by you or by any human court; indeed, I do not even judge myself. 4 My conscience is clear, but that does not make me innocent.9 – 1 Thess 1:3-4 – The apostles were destined to face persecution. 14 – 1 Thess 2:11, 5:14 – Paul dealt with the Thessalonians as a father would his children. Those who do wrong need to be warned. 16 – 1 Corinthians 11:1, Philippians 3:17 – Paul asked others to follow him as he followed Christ. Verse by Verse Commentary: 1-2 Spiritual Resources Available (1 Corinthians 1:4–9) Bible Commentary / Produced by TOW Project. According to the conventions of ancient letter writing, a greeting was followed by a section in which the author praised the recipient. [1] In most of his letters, Paul modifies this literary form by offering thanksgiving rather than praise and by ... CHAPTER 4 . This, then, is how you ought to regard us: as servants of Christ and as those entrusted with the mysteries God has revealed. 1 Corinthians 4:1. Paul, Apollos and the other leaders were just servants of Christ. The apostle does not use the normal Greek word of diakonos for "servant" but rather, the word hupēretēs.1 Corinthians 4:9 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓] 1 Corinthians 4:9, NIV: For it seems to me that God has put us apostles on display at the end of the procession, like those condemned to die in the arena. We have been made a spectacle to the whole universe, to angels as well as to human beings. 1 Corinthians 4:1 Let a man regard us in this manner, as servants of Christ and stewards of the mysteries of God. Amplified - SO THEN, let us [apostles] be looked upon as ministering servants of Christ and stewards (trustees) of the mysteries (the secret purposes) of God.The Ministry of Apostles. 4 This is how one should regard us, as servants of Christ and n stewards of the mysteries of God. 2 Moreover, it is required of stewards that they be found faithful. 3 But with me it is a very small thing that I should be judged by you or by any human court. Mar 15, 2009 · Rather, God comes to us and establishes the terms of the encounter of faith in the proclamation of the cross. Throughout 1 Corinthians, Paul is confronting various forms of social, theological, spiritual, and moral elitism which have fractured and stratified God’s church in Corinth (1:11-13). The core of Paul’s appeal is for a unified ... 1 Corinthians 4 (King James Version) 1 Let a man so account of us, as of the ministers of Christ, and stewards of the mysteries of God. 2 Moreover it is required in stewards, that a man be found faithful. 3 But with me it is a very small thing that I should be judged of you, or of man's judgment: yea, I judge not mine own self.1 Corinthians 4:4 “For I know nothing by myself; yet am I not hereby justified: but he that judgeth me is the Lord.” Justified, as we have explained before, means just as if I had never sinned. Paul in this, however, is saying he ministers what the Holy Spirit of God gives him. 1 Corinthians 4:1-5. Paul, embroiled in a situation where he was being judged for the way he conducted his affairs as God's apostle, gives some excellent advice. Passing judgment on someone based on our narrow perspective and subjectivity is an exercise in futility and vain, with nothing of spiritual value to be gained from it. 11) place the apostles in the class of those to whom the beatitudes promise future relief (Mt 5:3–11; Lk 6:20–23); whereas the Corinthians’ image of themselves as “already” filled, rich, ruling , as wise, strong, and honored (1 Cor 4:10) places them paradoxically in the position of those whom the woes threaten with future undoing (Lk ... The one who judges me is the Lord. (5) Therefore, judge nothing before the appointed time, wait until the Lord comes. He will bring to light the things hidden in darkness and will reveal the intentions of the hearts, and then each one shall receive from God the praise he deserves. (1 Corinthians 4:3-5) (Read 1 Corinthians 4:7-13) We have no reason to be proud; all we have, or are, or do, that is good, is owing to the free and rich grace of God. A sinner snatched from destruction by sovereign grace alone, must be very absurd and inconsistent, if proud of the free gifts of God. St. Paul sets forth his own circumstances, ver. 9.1 Corinthians 4:6-7. These people were using the gifts that God gave to them to divide the church. They were separating themselves into cliques, getting people in the congregation to say, "I am of Paul, I am of Apollos, I am of Peter," and so forth because "Peter represents this, Paul represents this other thing, and what Paul has is better," and "Peter is not teaching this, and Paul is ... (Read all of 1 Corinthians 4) As for the apostle and the labourers, they were to consider them as stewards employed by the Lord. And it was to Him that Paul committed the judgment of his conduct. He cared little for the judgment man might form respecting him. He was not conscious of anything wrong, but that did not justify him.1Cr 4:7-13. Here the apostle improves the foregoing hint to a caution against pride and self-conceit, and sets forth the temptations the Corinthians had to despise him, from the difference of their circumstances. I. 1Cr 4:7-13. Here the apostle improves the foregoing hint to a caution against pride and self-conceit, and sets forth the temptations the Corinthians had to despise him, from the difference of their circumstances. I. The Ministry of Apostles. 4 This is how one should regard us, as servants of Christ and n stewards of the mysteries of God. 2 Moreover, it is required of stewards that they be found faithful. 3 But with me it is a very small thing that I should be judged by you or by any human court. 1 Corinthians chapter 4. New International Version. 1 This, then, is how you ought to regard us: as servants of Christ and as those entrusted with the mysteries God has revealed. 2 Now it is required that those who have been given a trust must prove faithful. 3 I care very little if I am judged by you or by any human court; indeed, I do not even judge myself. 4 My conscience is clear, but that does not make me innocent.1 let a man so account of us, as of the ministers of christ, and stewards of the mysteries of god. 2 moreover it is required in stewards, that a man be found faithful. 3 but with me it is a very small thing that i should be judged of you, or of man's judgment: yea, i judge not mine own self. 4 for i know nothing by myself; yet am i not hereby … 1 Corinthians 4:4. For I know nothing by myself. Which must be understood with a restriction to the subject he is upon, faithfulness in the ministry; otherwise he knew much by himself of indwelling sin, and the corruption of his nature, which he sometimes found very strong and prevalent in him, and of the daily infirmities of life; but as to his ministerial service, he was pure from the blood of all men; he honestly declared what he knew to be the mind of God, and concealed nothing ...1 Corinthians 4:15 For though ye have ten thousand instructors in Christ, yet have ye not many fathers: for in Christ Jesus I have begotten you through the gospel. God places people in our life for seasons. some stay / some go We learn from everyone around us if we just pay attention teachers, ...read more. Scripture: 1 Corinthians 4:15. 9 – 1 Thess 1:3-4 – The apostles were destined to face persecution. 14 – 1 Thess 2:11, 5:14 – Paul dealt with the Thessalonians as a father would his children. Those who do wrong need to be warned. 16 – 1 Corinthians 11:1, Philippians 3:17 – Paul asked others to follow him as he followed Christ. Verse by Verse Commentary: 1-2 Calvin's Commentary. MacLaren's Expositions. New Testament Individual Books. Chapter 4. THE THREE JUDGMENTS ( 1 Corinthians 4:1-5 ) 4:1-5 Let a man then so think of us as the servants of Christ and stewards of the secrets which God reveals to his own people. In ordinary everyday life, that a man should be found faithful, is a quality required ... Spiritual Resources Available (1 Corinthians 1:4–9) Bible Commentary / Produced by TOW Project. According to the conventions of ancient letter writing, a greeting was followed by a section in which the author praised the recipient. [1] In most of his letters, Paul modifies this literary form by offering thanksgiving rather than praise and by ... The Church in Corinth and Paul’s Letters (1 Corinthians) Paul arrived in Corinth in the winter of AD 49/50 [4] and lived there for a year and a half. While there he supported himself by working in tentmaking—or perhaps leather working [5] (Acts 18:2), the trade he had learned as a boy—in the workshop of Aquila and Priscilla (see 1 Cor. 4: ... 1 Corinthians 4:1. Let a man, &c. — Having warned the believers at Corinth against entertaining an undue esteem for their own ministers, he now proceeds to show them in what light they ought to view all true ministers of Christ: and lest, from what was advanced in the preceding chapters concerning the inspiration of the apostles by the Holy Spirit, these Corinthians should imagine that Paul claimed to himself and his brethren an authority not derived from Christ, he here tells them that ...Jun 26, 2004 · Introduction. Corinth was a strategically located Roman city on the main land route between East and West and was the crossroads for several sea routes. Corinth was famous for its intellectual and material prosperity and was honored with being the capitol of Achaia. It also became famous for its corruption. Click the verse number to read commentary, definitions, meanings, and notes for that particular 1-corinthians 4 verse. 1-corinthians 4:1 Let a man so account of us, as of the ministers of Christ, and stewards of the mysteries of God. 1-corinthians 4:2 Moreover it is required in stewards, that a man be found faithful. 1 Corinthians: Epistle to the 21st Century. We do, however, speak a message of wisdom among the mature, but not the wisdom of this age or of the rulers of this age, who are coming to nothing. No, we speak of God's secret wisdom, a wisdom that has been hidden and that God destined for our glory before time began. (1 Corinthians 2:6-7) The Church in Corinth and Paul’s Letters (1 Corinthians) Paul arrived in Corinth in the winter of AD 49/50 [4] and lived there for a year and a half. While there he supported himself by working in tentmaking—or perhaps leather working [5] (Acts 18:2), the trade he had learned as a boy—in the workshop of Aquila and Priscilla (see 1 Cor. 4: ... CHAPTER 4 . This, then, is how you ought to regard us: as servants of Christ and as those entrusted with the mysteries God has revealed. 1 Corinthians 4:1. Paul, Apollos and the other leaders were just servants of Christ. The apostle does not use the normal Greek word of diakonos for “servant” but rather, the word hupēretēs. Paul begins 1 Corinthians 4 by agreeing that he and the other ministers are servants of Christ and stewards of the mysteries of God. In that role, it does matter that they are faithful, and the Lord will judge their works when the time comes. Paul, though, is not worried about the opinion of the Corinthians or anyone else. They are not his judges. Aug 12, 2002 · 1 Corinthians 4:9. “For I think that God has displayed us, the apostles, last, as men condemned to death; for we have been made a spectacle to the world, both to angels and to men.”. For I think that God has displayed us, the apostles, last, as men condemned to death; God “displayed” the apostles last as men condemned to death. Matthew Henry Bible Commentary (complete) << 1 Corinthians 3 | 1 Corinthians 4 | 1 Corinthians 5 >>. (Read all of 1 Corinthians 4) Complete Concise. In this chapter the apostle, I. Directs them how to account of him and his fellow-ministers, and therein, tacitly at least, reproves them for their unworthy carriage towards him (v. 1-6). II. 11) place the apostles in the class of those to whom the beatitudes promise future relief (Mt 5:3–11; Lk 6:20–23); whereas the Corinthians’ image of themselves as “already” filled, rich, ruling , as wise, strong, and honored (1 Cor 4:10) places them paradoxically in the position of those whom the woes threaten with future undoing (Lk ... See verses 3-5 (printed below) Now it is a very insignificant matter to me that I should be judged by you or by any human court; indeed, I do not even judge myself. (4) I know of no charge against me; but this does not justify me. The one who judges me is the Lord. (5) Therefore, judge nothing before the appointed time, wait until the Lord comes. 1Cr 4:7-13. Here the apostle improves the foregoing hint to a caution against pride and self-conceit, and sets forth the temptations the Corinthians had to despise him, from the difference of their circumstances. I. 1 Corinthians 4:10 "We [are] fools for Christ's sake, but ye [are] wise in Christ; we [are] weak, but ye [are] strong; ye [are] honorable, but we [are] despised." "Fools…Wise": Again, Paul is using sarcasm. This time on himself as if mimicking the attitude of the proud Corinthians toward him, Paul rebukes them.The word of God is the best rule by which to judge as to men. Pride commonly is at the bottom of quarrels. Self-conceit contributes to produce undue esteem of our teachers, as well as of ourselves. We shall not be puffed up for one against another, if we remember that all are instruments, employed by God, and endowed by him with various talents. 1 Corinthians: Epistle to the 21st Century. We do, however, speak a message of wisdom among the mature, but not the wisdom of this age or of the rulers of this age, who are coming to nothing. No, we speak of God's secret wisdom, a wisdom that has been hidden and that God destined for our glory before time began. (1 Corinthians 2:6-7) Jun 26, 2004 · Introduction. Corinth was a strategically located Roman city on the main land route between East and West and was the crossroads for several sea routes. Corinth was famous for its intellectual and material prosperity and was honored with being the capitol of Achaia. It also became famous for its corruption. Spiritual Resources Available (1 Corinthians 1:4–9) Bible Commentary / Produced by TOW Project. According to the conventions of ancient letter writing, a greeting was followed by a section in which the author praised the recipient. [1] In most of his letters, Paul modifies this literary form by offering thanksgiving rather than praise and by ... God is the one who gives his servants their work and they are responsible to him, not to anyone else (4:1-2). Paul is not concerned about the Corinthians' assessment of him. Even Paul himself cannot properly assess how true his service has been. He may not know of any failure in his service, but that does not mean he is faultless.A. The contrast between tongues and prophecy. 1. ( 1Cr 14:1) The guiding principles. Pursue love, and desire spiritual gifts, but especially that you may prophesy. a. Pursue love: Paul, under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, brilliantly declared the preeminence of love for Christians in 1 Corinthians 13. Now, since love is the greatest, we ... 1 Corinthians 4 Inductive Bible Study and Discussion Questions Outline: Paul and Apollos were stewards for God (1-2) The final exam (3-5) Paul didn't consider human opinions of himself important (3) Paul was innocent as far as he knew, but would finally be examined by God (4)1Cr 4:7-13. Here the apostle improves the foregoing hint to a caution against pride and self-conceit, and sets forth the temptations the Corinthians had to despise him, from the difference of their circumstances. I. Smith's Bible Commentary. Chapter 4. 1 Corinthians 4:1. Ministers of Christ, the Greek word there is the under-rowers. They were the guys down in the bottom of the ship handling the oars, usually chained to the oars. And the fellow up on top would call the order for them to row and which side to row, the under-rowers. 1Cr 4:7-13. Here the apostle improves the foregoing hint to a caution against pride and self-conceit, and sets forth the temptations the Corinthians had to despise him, from the difference of their circumstances. I. "The first paragraph ( 1 Corinthians 4:1-5) leads the way by making an application of the servant model and showing how that relates to their treatment of him [Paul]. He changes images from farm to household and insists that he is God's servant, not theirs; and they are not allowed to judge another's servant.1 Corinthians 4:6-7. These people were using the gifts that God gave to them to divide the church. They were separating themselves into cliques, getting people in the congregation to say, "I am of Paul, I am of Apollos, I am of Peter," and so forth because "Peter represents this, Paul represents this other thing, and what Paul has is better," and "Peter is not teaching this, and Paul is ... 1 Corinthians 4:10 "We [are] fools for Christ's sake, but ye [are] wise in Christ; we [are] weak, but ye [are] strong; ye [are] honorable, but we [are] despised." "Fools…Wise": Again, Paul is using sarcasm. This time on himself as if mimicking the attitude of the proud Corinthians toward him, Paul rebukes them.Enduring Word Bible Commentary 1 Corinthians Chapter 4 1 Corinthians 4 – Are You Glorified Without Us? A. How the Corinthians should consider Paul and the apostles. 1. (1-2) Servants and stewards. Let a man so consider us, as servants of Christ and stewards of the mysteries of God. Moreover it is required in stewards that one be found faithful. a. The apostle exhorts to have in proper esteem the preachers of the Gospel, and that because they are Christ's ministers and stewards of his grace, and faithful in the discharge of their duty, 1 Corinthians 4:1. And as for himself, whom he includes in the number of the faithful dispensers of the word, he cared not what judgment was passed upon ... See verses 3-5 (printed below) Now it is a very insignificant matter to me that I should be judged by you or by any human court; indeed, I do not even judge myself. (4) I know of no charge against me; but this does not justify me. The one who judges me is the Lord. (5) Therefore, judge nothing before the appointed time, wait until the Lord comes. 1 Corinthians 4:4 “For I know nothing by myself; yet am I not hereby justified: but he that judgeth me is the Lord.” Justified, as we have explained before, means just as if I had never sinned. Paul in this, however, is saying he ministers what the Holy Spirit of God gives him. The apostle exhorts to have in proper esteem the preachers of the Gospel, and that because they are Christ's ministers and stewards of his grace, and faithful in the discharge of their duty, 1 Corinthians 4:1. And as for himself, whom he includes in the number of the faithful dispensers of the word, he cared not what judgment was passed upon ... 1 Corinthians 4:10 "We [are] fools for Christ's sake, but ye [are] wise in Christ; we [are] weak, but ye [are] strong; ye [are] honorable, but we [are] despised." "Fools…Wise": Again, Paul is using sarcasm. This time on himself as if mimicking the attitude of the proud Corinthians toward him, Paul rebukes them.1 Corinthians 13:4-7. In the New Testament, the most common Greek word for self-control (temperance, KJV) is enkrateia. Its root meaning is "power over oneself" or "self-mastery." Self-control, in its widest sense, is mastery over our passions. It is the virtue that holds our appetites in check, controlling our rational will or regulating our ... Jun 26, 2004 · Introduction. Corinth was a strategically located Roman city on the main land route between East and West and was the crossroads for several sea routes. Corinth was famous for its intellectual and material prosperity and was honored with being the capitol of Achaia. It also became famous for its corruption. 1 This, then, is how you ought to regard us: as servants of Christ and as those entrusted with the mysteries God has revealed. 2 Now it is required that those who have been given a trust must prove faithful. 3 I care very little if I am judged by you or by any human court; indeed, I do not even judge myself. 4 My conscience is clear, but that ... Aug 12, 2002 · 1 Corinthians 4:9. “For I think that God has displayed us, the apostles, last, as men condemned to death; for we have been made a spectacle to the world, both to angels and to men.”. 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